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 Post subject: My Testimony to the Amazing Power of TSM
PostPosted: Sun Mar 31, 2013 3:41 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 31, 2013 3:12 pm
Posts: 16
Hello, everyone. My old account is locked out (by my choosing) so I thought I'd just create a new one and make a fresh start. My testimony below is not the best-written in the world, but I wanted to write it out so that people could share it with loved ones or other drinkers. If you've been following my posts, it will all be old hat. It's more of a summary of my highlights.

Please feel free to contact me at barrybrockelman@yahoo.com. Thanks to the administrators of this website. It was an important part of my turnaround.

_________________
Barry from Texas
Pre-TSM 25-40 drinks per week, compulsively,secretly,nightly,lots of dangerous behavior
Started 1/5/13
Week Count: 11,4,4,2,7.5,2.5,2,2,0,0,0,0 Cured -- No More Counting


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 Post subject: Re: My Testimony to the Amazing Power of TSM
PostPosted: Sun Mar 31, 2013 3:42 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 31, 2013 3:12 pm
Posts: 16
March 31,2013
I am risen! I just wanted to write this “cured” testimony as my way of expressing my gratitude for what The Sinclair Method (TSM) has done for me in a relatively short time (90 days) and to hopefully provide some hope for those struggling with TSM or those who might be interested for themselves or a loved one. My results have been remarkable and, likely, not typical; however, I think I can articulate what it “feels like” to be cured via Naltrexone + One Hour + Drinking, the simple formula of the Sinclair Method.

TSM in a Nutshell
If you’re not familiar with The Sinclair Method, let me briefly explain. Although it’s called a “method,” it’s actually quite simple. TSM is an evidence-based, clinically proven method of reducing or eliminating alcohol abuse using Naltrexone, a powerful opioid antagonist (basically, it occupies all of the opioid receptor neurons in your brain). The alcohol addict takes a 50mg Naltrexone tablet one hour before drinking, and then simply drinks what he or she wants. The method works by reversing the operant conditioning that the drinker has gained over many thousands of drinking sessions; in each of these sessions, the act of drinking released endogenous opioids (aka “endorphins,” the brain’s own “morphine,” if you will) and created a strong link between alcohol and an endorphin rush that occurs subconsciously. An alcohol addict will continue to be driven to drink, even when the subjective pleasure is gone and the negatives of drinking are obvious. Over time, typically 3-4 months, the drinker will notice less and less craving for alcohol and even less pleasure in drinking. One is “cured” if their cravings are under control and they drink at “safe” levels, generally defined as no more than 5 drinks in one day or about 24 drinks in one week. After a cure is reached, the drinker continues to take a pill one hour before drinking for the rest of their life or, as I prefer, “for the foreseeable future.”

My Drinking Story
I have told this story multiple times on this website, but it never hurts to tell it again. Wow. I could really write a lot about my drinking, but I don’t want to focus too much on it. My earliest memories of drinking start around age 12. I started sneaking liquor from my parents’ well-stocked liquor cabinet, then started drinking off and on after school at a friend’s house. I even have a classic picture from the early 80s of me and two friends chugging champagne at a wedding (we were in 6th grade!). High school involved multiple binge drinking sessions with beer and liquor. Eventually, I all but depleted the liquor cabinet at my house. The last item was some Kentucky moonshine which I polished off with some friends. This early drinking, I’m convinced, did something to my brain. It primed me for alcohol addiction.

I had a dramatic religious experience my freshman year in college, and went a whole year without drinking. After that, I picked it up moderately here and there. I got married right out of college and both my wife and I went on to earn Ph.Ds and had four beautiful children. We have now been married over 20 years. I snuck drinks here and there during my twenties, with binge drinking off and on, mostly related to “occasions,” like parties, birthdays, romantic nights, holidays and the like. My addiction, as I see it, started in my early 30s. I had a job as a professor and ended up quitting it (for multiple reasons). At the time, I was financially and spiritually bankrupt (I had invested using margin loans, lost everything, and gained a massive margin debt I couldn’t pay). The stress and sleepless nights were unbearable. Alcohol was the obvious solution for me. It really worked well to get my mind off my problems and helped me get to sleep at night. Without it, I tossed and turned. With it, I slept and actually seemed to function better overall. My wife began to work during the day and I made a quick career change into healthcare, working as an RN at an inner-city ER at night. The job itself was pretty stressful, but the toll of nightshift on my mind and body was profound. By this point, I had become a daily drinker.

There were distinct stages in my addiction. First, as I mentioned, I would drink based on what was happening. If there was a vacation, or a party, or a Friday / Saturday night, or whatever, I would drink 100% of the time. The next stage is to switch to “time of day,” except for when it’s inappropriate. So, I would drink every day at 5:00, except when, for example, I had to do something where being drunk would be inappropriate (e.g. a parent-teacher meeting). The next stage is to drink based on time of day, even when it’s inappropriate (e.g. before going to church, before any conceivable family activity, it didn’t matter). From there, you can only progress by expanding your “drinking time” (I moved mine down to “no earlier than 2:00”) and by drinking more quantity and in a more dysfunctional manner.

To cut to the chase, until I started TSM on 1/5/13 I had spent the last nine or ten years as a daily drinker, drinking almost all of it in secret, and progressing from beer to rum to, finally, vodka. I would open a beer at home and drink it to explain my boozy breath, and proceed to drink anywhere from 4-10 vodka shots or beers in secret (usually in my closet, in the car, or on the side of the house). I did many stupid, shameful, and dangerous things because of alcohol. I had tried multiple times to quit based on will power – Moderation Management, Rational Recovery. A couple years ago I bought a breathalyzer with the brilliant idea of telling my wife about my drinking problem and having her monitor it. I thought that was the only way I could ever break free from this cycle. I never told her my grand plan, and used the breathalyzer to master guessing my BAC so I could decide whether or not to submit to a blood draw when / if I got pulled over during one of my frequent drunk driving episodes. I also had the phone number of a good lawyer. I pretty much resigned myself to one of the “five fates” of an alcoholic – dying a traumatic death, causing a traumatic death, liver failure, pancreatitis, or gastrointestinal bleeding. I opted for dying a traumatic death, provided no one else got hurt. I have seen hundreds of alcoholic patients suffer through these fates. I know what each one sounds like, looks like, and smells like.

Those ten years seem like a blur. In total, I calculated that I drank about 99.8% of the 1900 or so nights off before starting TSM (that’s one alcohol free day for every 500 – mostly when I was too sick to drink). Note: I never drank before my night shift so, technically, I had three AF days per week for the past eight years. Perhaps this helped me.

What It Feels Like to Be Addicted
Before I discuss my subjective experience of being “cured,” I thought it might be useful to articulate what my experience of addiction was like. It’s hard to describe such things – it’s like trying to answer the question, “What does mustard taste like?” or “How does it feel to be in love?” I never developed a physical addiction to alcohol. Besides moodiness and hangovers, I didn’t really have “withdrawals” and I could go days without any alcohol if I was working several nights in a row. On my days off, though, I would start planning my drinking in the morning. If I needed to run up to the liquor store to stock up while the wife was away, I would do that. The best word to describe how I drank is “compulsion.” I didn’t usually “feel” anything like anxiety or shaking. Like a robot, though, I would head to the liquor store, buy my allotment and drink. If my plans were thwarted, though, I would become extremely tense and anxious. If I had no vodka and the liquor stores were closing, I would make up any excuse to get in my car (or go “jogging”) and head to the liquor store. If we were in another town or part of the city, I would frantically drive up and down busy streets looking for a liquor store. On occasion, I couldn’t get my precious vodka. Those nights, I’d have to settle for gas station beer, but it was better than nothing.
As I mentioned, when I was sober, my drive to drink was primarily “robotic” and automatic. However, once I started my drinking session, I would have overwhelming, fantastical, outrageous desires for more alcohol. One felt great, two felt better, and, according to my drunk-guy math, ten would feel even greater! It was then that I would be like a vampire searching for blood, or a hungry tiger searching for prey. I would often make three to four trips to the liquor store in one night, buying 2-3 vodka minis and telling myself “these will be the last ones tonight” each time.

How I Happened Onto the Sinclair Method
So, I had “tried to quit” for years. Last fall, there was really nothing special about my desire to quit at the time. However, I had an assignment in a marketing class to find a youtube video promoting a healthcare product. I, of course, typed in “alcohol rehab” and found a commercial about a rehab center that used a mysterious implant placed into the patient’s stomach to instantly cure him from alcohol. The “treatment” seemed so interesting. Get an implant and, like magic, no more drinking! I researched this implant, found out it was Naloxone (implant form of Naltrexone), and began google-ing this possibility. From there, I discovered that Naltrexone implants are actually NOT associated with high success rates. I also found thesinclairmethod.com. I spent over 15 hours reading posts and was quite convinced of the logic behind the Sinclair Method. As an ER nurse, I’m very familiar with Narcan (the IV form of Naltrexone) and had given it many times to reverse overdoses of opioids. I knew that, as drugs go, this is a highly effective, fast-acting drug that faithfully accomplishes its one simple task – binding to opiod receptors with brutal efficiency. Picture a comatose patient who OD’d on opioids (e.g. Oxycontin) that won’t even respond to pinches or a knuckle-rub to the chest. Give them Narcan. Wait a few seconds. Eyes pop open. They typically vomit, and then say something like, “What the f**k!” I also knew that you couldn’t overdose on Narcan / Naltrexone (you can give a patient multiple vials of the stuff with no noticeable effects if they are NOT on opioids), and that your body doesn’t adjust to it (meaning, you don’t develop a tolerance and need more and more to get the same effect). Needless to say, I figured it was worth a try and I was quite excited to try it after waiting my two weeks for it to get shipped here (got it from alldaychemist.com).

My First Week with TSM
Day One for me was a Sunday. Since liquor stores are closed, I bought a ½ pint of vodka the day before and hid it in the bushes of a hardware store a few miles away (so I wouldn’t drink it Saturday night). I took my pill and drove up to retrieve my vodka. Drum roll. I felt a little facial flushing. I waited an hour. I quickly took two shots of vodka. It felt strange. I could definitely sense the alcohol but had no “crazy” feeling. A little bit later, I took a third shot and then automatically poured the fourth shot down the sink. I knew right then that TSM was going to be a “game changer” for me. The next three drinking sessions were about the same. At one point, I couldn’t even swallow the vodka and just spit it out. I’m sure the next statement is debatable, but I stand by it: 90% of my “cure” came in those first four drinking sessions.

Imagine a giant wall between addicted-you and cured-you. I was expecting to gradually, brick by brick, break through this wall slowly, drink by drink, over many months. I had no real expectation that I would even have an alcohol free night for months. However, for me, The Sinclar Method was like a giant bulldozer that plowed through this wall in short order, reversing years of poor decisions and dysfunctional drinking.

The Next Seven Weeks
My second week, I easily (let me repeat, “e-a-s-i-l-y”) had two AF nights in a row, which I hadn’t done in over a decade. If it wasn’t easy, I wouldn’t have done it, because I’m pretty much a weakling when it comes to self-control. Weeks 3-8 saw one milestone after another accomplished for me. First Saturday night without drinking in years, first wife-out-of-town without drinking, first time my wife had a drink in front of me without me drinking, first time an open bottle of wine lasted more than a week in my mini-bar, on and on. Not only that, as I have expressed before, I felt as though I had been freed from a strange spell that had been cast over me. That’s the best analogy I have. All the things I used to enjoy but couldn’t slowly returned. I enjoyed alcohol free nights so much that I didn’t want to work overtime at work just so I could stay home and NOT drink. It was that refreshing – like being in a wheelchair for years and suddenly being able to walk again. Being alcohol-addicted is like that – giving yourself a disability and mental retardation on purpose.

The Last Month
I could have called myself “cured” after two months, but wanted to throw in an alcohol free month just to make my tale more convincing. Nothing exciting happened in the past month in terms of drinking. I have zero cravings, there is beer getting skanky in my bar that I’m not interested in, and my life has done a complete 180. Instead of drinking, I’m spending those extra six or so non-stuporous hours a night reading, swimming, jogging, playing with the kids, working on projects, and enjoying the best sleep I have had in years (and the best mornings, too). A fellow drinker at work asked me, “Aren’t you just so bored right now without alcohol?” To me, that seemed like such a dumb question. Really, alcohol lost its fun for me years ago. Since then, it’s been mostly just a curse – a nonsensical, self-induced coma every night to “escape” a pretty sweet life!

What It Feels Like to be Cured
I guess it doesn’t really feel like anything. Pick a drug that you have never used and don’t have any desire to use (e.g. heroin, crack cocaine, meth). Do you crave it? Do you feel like life is dull and pointless without it? Will you do whatever it takes to get this drug? Of course, the answer to all these is no. To be “cured” is to simply add alcohol to this list of drugs you don’t really want. Maybe that’s a bit of an exaggeration, but it’s the best analogy I can think of. For me, whereas it took a Herculean effort to even wait until after dinner to drink, now it takes no effort to not drink at all. It’s so much a part of my memory, though, that I still think about it. For example, I have relatives in town and last night almost reflexively thought I should drink something. It took a slight bit of effort to abstain, but not really. Needless to say, last night was the first time in about 22 years I had relatives visit without drinking (usually, I drink quite a bit!).

The Big Question
Where do I go from here? If I was in AA and had white-knuckled myself to this point, I would be really worried about “relapsing.” I’m not worried, though, because I know that if I want to drink again, I can if I take my Naltrexone one hour before drinking. My personal goal is to drink no more than 1-2 times per month from here on out, perhaps never again. Who knows? I’m not anti-alcohol, I’m just really not interested anymore. If I ever stop taking Naltrexone, get re-addicted, and go right back from whence I came, it would be a huge personal failure on my part and would be nothing less than the self-destruction (akin to slow suicide) that drinkers tend to fall into. God forbid that happens to me after the gift I’ve been given!

Tips and Insights, Most of Which I’ve Posted Before

Applicable to TSMers
**Try to thoughtfully and slowly drink your first 1-2 drinks once your “hour” is up. Don’t overwhelm your brain with a quadruple screwdriver in the first 10 minutes, because you likely will not be reducing your drinking anytime soon.
**Racking up alcohol-free days seems to be one of the keys to success. Personally, I don’t buy the need to drink for every “trigger” you have (e.g. “ I have to drink when my relatives are here, so I can extinguish that trigger.”). Abstaining seems to extinguish triggers just as well and I think the idea that your brain has all these categories of “Triggers That Must Be Extinguished Before I’m Sober” is very debatable. Your brain just thinks: “Alcohol = endorphins. Me like endorphins.”
**Try to picture what it would be like to 100% abstain like AA suggests, and consider how lucky you are to be in TSM. Think how much easier and more enjoyable it is to gain control of alcohol this way versus that way.

Applicable to All Drinkers (things that have helped me)
**Exercise is very, very important. We have done years of damage to our brains and organs, and nothing is proven to help the body heal itself more than exercise. There is no drug as powerful as exercise.
**At least for awhile, take all the money you are saving from reduced drinking, and use it for self-improvement . Books, supplements, gym memberships, or whatever helps you succeed.
**Tell your spouse or significant other all about your drinking and all about TSM. Having someone keep you accountable is very powerful.
**Music is also proven to be powerful. Find an inspiring “sobriety” song and play it over and over in the car, or while jogging, or whenever it helps. I also enjoy relaxing “New Age” music or chant. My recovery song was: "Angels or Devils (Live)" by Dishwalla.
**Whether you believe in God or not, meditating, spiritual reading, and reflecting on the bad things alcohol has brought you, are all effective in helping you quit. Personally, I recommend Buddhist teaching because it is practical, useful even to non-believers, and deals with mind transformation (which, after all, is what TSM is about). If you have a faith, read some inspiring works from authors who share that faith.
**If you can’t picture life without alcohol, go to Wikipedia and search “teetotaler celebrities” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_teetotalers Find someone on that list that you can relate to and try to envision them at a party, on vacation, or with their family and friends. Try to emulate that.
**Draw a wheel with spokes on it. In the middle, put “alcohol.” On each spoke, write all the things that are impacted by alcohol. For me, it was things like, “Can’t exercise at night,” “Feel bad in the morning,” "Sexual dysfunction," “Not reading enough,” and “Setting Bad Example for my Family.” Envision how eliminating alcohol will almost instantly solve these problems. Use that to motivate you.
**Visit rationalrecovery.org and read through its “short course.” I found it very helpful to really try to “recognize” my “addictive voice," even though I don't agree overall with the approach of that method.

_________________
Barry from Texas
Pre-TSM 25-40 drinks per week, compulsively,secretly,nightly,lots of dangerous behavior
Started 1/5/13
Week Count: 11,4,4,2,7.5,2.5,2,2,0,0,0,0 Cured -- No More Counting


Last edited by barryb2 on Sun Mar 31, 2013 6:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: My Testimony to the Amazing Power of TSM
PostPosted: Sun Mar 31, 2013 5:19 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 09, 2013 12:22 pm
Posts: 8
Location: Connecticut
Bravo Barry, thanks for the Easter inspiration. The tips at the end are especially useful, I see a few I want to employ. Coming clean to your spouse is huge I've found, and brings you much closer really. I also see a wonderful, discrete therapist every 2 weeks, so I don't feel like I'm going this without some outside help. Early results are promising. Grateful for your ray of hope.


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 Post subject: Re: My Testimony to the Amazing Power of TSM
PostPosted: Sun Mar 31, 2013 5:49 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2012 9:27 pm
Posts: 69
barryb2 wrote:
March 31,2013
What It Feels Like to be Cured
I guess it doesn’t really feel like anything. Pick a drug that you have never used and don’t have any desire to use (e.g. heroin, crack cocaine, meth). Do you crave it? Do you feel like life is dull and pointless without it? Will you do whatever it takes to get this drug? Of course, the answer to all these is no. To be “cured” is to simply add alcohol to this list of drugs you don’t really want. Maybe that’s a bit of an exaggeration, but it’s the best analogy I can think of. For me, whereas it took a Herculean effort to even wait until after dinner to drink, now it takes no effort to not drink at all. It’s so much a part of my memory, though, that I still think about it. For example, I have relatives in town and last night almost reflexively thought I should drink something. It took a slight bit of effort to abstain, but not really. Needless to say, last night was the first time in about 22 years I had relatives visit without drinking (usually, I drink quite a bit!).

The Big Question
Where do I go from here? If I was in AA and had white-knuckled myself to this point, I would be really worried about “relapsing.” I’m not worried, though, because I know that if I want to drink again, I can if I take my Naltrexone one hour before drinking. My personal goal is to drink no more than 1-2 times per month from here on out, perhaps never again. Who knows? I’m not anti-alcohol, I’m just really not interested anymore. If I ever stop taking Naltrexone, get re-addicted, and go right back from whence I came, it would be a huge personal failure on my part and would be nothing less than the self-destruction (akin to slow suicide) that drinkers tend to fall into. God forbid that happens to me after the gift I’ve been given!


Barry - fantastic post! You put into words what many of us, myself included, feel but can't say so eloquently.

You're absolutely right about the "cured" feeling not feeling like anything. It feels like I was never addicted to alcohol at all. I don't crave it, don't plan ahead for it, and don't drink it much anymore. The only thing that reminds me that I was addicted are the memories.

Like you, I feel like I've been given the best gift I could ever receive. There are literally millions of living people who will spend their entire adult lives fighting alcohol, and millions before them who have died from drinking. We need to spread the word!

_________________
Pre-TSM - 60-70 US units per week
Week 1 - 39u/0AF
Week 2 - 41.5u/0AF
Week 3 - 36.5u/1AF
Week 4 - 39u/1AF
Week 5 - 43u/1AF
Week 6 - 25.5u/0AF
Week 7 - 23.5u/5AF
Week 8 - 23u/3AF
Week 9 - 0u/7AF
Week 10 - 9u/5AF
Week 11 - 13u/5AF

CURED - December 2012


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 Post subject: Re: My Testimony to the Amazing Power of TSM
PostPosted: Sun Mar 31, 2013 9:20 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 07, 2013 10:16 pm
Posts: 67
Great post Barry.

I hope you stay on the forum, b/c your positive posts really do help people. I know they helped me.

Cheers and congrats on the new out look on things.

Dave


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 Post subject: Re: My Testimony to the Amazing Power of TSM
PostPosted: Mon Apr 01, 2013 9:08 am 
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Joined: Sat Jan 05, 2013 12:04 pm
Posts: 313
Location: Midwest, USA
Words cannot express how happy I am for you, and how your experience supports my plan for my own control.

Thanks Friend! :D

_________________
Start 1-19-2013 18/day 120/wk
MO-DailyAvg-AF
1-14-0
2-13-1
3-10-6
4-7-14
5-8-9
6-9-11
7-6-9
8-10-2
9-10-3
10-9-1
11-7-3
12-8-2
13-7-9
14-7-5
15-6?-8?


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 Post subject: Re: My Testimony to the Amazing Power of TSM
PostPosted: Tue Apr 02, 2013 7:42 am 
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Posts: 16
So, I drank last night for the first time after 30 or so days. I made two frozen vodka pink lemonades for me and my wife. I was a bit worried that I was going to love it and start a whole new cycle of drinking again. Took my Nal, waited an hour....Blah. First, it was like someone substituted rubbing alcohol for the vodka. It took effort to even get any down. Halfway through my pink drink, I'm like, "Ugh. I can't take anymore." I was dizzy -- not the good kind of dizzy, like when you're buzzing. I felt just like I would if I stood up and did about fifty fast spins in circles. Sort of that mildly nauseous, uncomfortable dizzy. I was going to just toss my drink, but my wife said, "Don't waste it" and gulped it down. She said she couldn't even taste the vodka! She's a very moderate drinker (3-4 drinks per month).

I suppose that experience was mostly good. I definitely extinguished my desire for alcohol for the meantime (which had been creeping up, not in the sense of "cravings," but in the sense of increased thoughts). The problem is, I would have liked to have enjoyed it somewhat because, in my head I want to be able to have a drink here and there in life, but if it's going to be like that, I have to either drink it without Nal or deal with those feelings. The time I drank before last night was mostly enjoyable (calming, no dizziness), but the week before THAT drink I had that dizziness. Oh well, maybe I'll try again in a few weeks or so. (On the positive, we made love and my erection was like an 18 year old on Viagra, so that was nice). :lol:

Update: The next day, I felt as though that one little drink made a big difference for me. Normally, I think about my "next drink." It used to be in terms of hours, at the beginning of TSM in terms of day, then weeks. After last night, I thought about the next time I'm going to have to decide to drink or not. This "time" is in June when I go on a beach vacation with another family in which the dad is always buying me drinks or opening beers and giving them to me. I'm just going to tell them ahead of time that, "I don't drink like I used to, and am really particular about when and how much I drink now, so don't be offended if I don't drink what you offer." Something like that.

_________________
Barry from Texas
Pre-TSM 25-40 drinks per week, compulsively,secretly,nightly,lots of dangerous behavior
Started 1/5/13
Week Count: 11,4,4,2,7.5,2.5,2,2,0,0,0,0 Cured -- No More Counting


Last edited by barryb2 on Thu Apr 04, 2013 6:53 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: My Testimony to the Amazing Power of TSM
PostPosted: Tue Apr 02, 2013 4:05 pm 
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Joined: Fri Feb 08, 2013 9:15 am
Posts: 101
Location: Scotland
Thanks Barry for all your words of wisdom - you have certainly helped me and I find your posts inspiring!

Well done on your brilliant progress and please keep posting Lorraine


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 Post subject: Re: My Testimony to the Amazing Power of TSM
PostPosted: Wed Apr 03, 2013 10:23 am 
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Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2011 4:58 pm
Posts: 97
Location: South, USA
Barry, thank you so much for your post. What an inspiration. Congratulations!!! This has not been a good week for me. In fact, I got up this morning thinking that maybe this was not going to work for me. It has been 15 months. However, after reading your post you have inspired me to keep on going and see this thing to the end. Great pointers and helpful hints. Thank you, thank you!
GA

_________________
Pre TMS 40+ No AF

Goal : Less than 10u per week/4+AF per week


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 Post subject: Re: My Testimony to the Amazing Power of TSM
PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 4:39 am 
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Joined: Fri May 13, 2011 6:52 am
Posts: 1003
Location: England
Brilliant post and some tips I agree with 100% - not rushing your drinks and taking AF days I think are key to this.

Newbies please note 90 days to cure is a very quick time, not everyone gets to this point so soon however I was well on my way at this point, and do believe doing as suggested on top of taking the pills reduces the time required.

_________________
Naltrexone Started 20th April 2011

Cravings eliminated Sept 2011
Now fully in control, alcohol no longer bothers me. Chose to go AF from 22nd July 2013.
TSM set me free


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